Dominican Amber Inclusions

Dominican Amber is renowned for the diversity of inclusions it contains. The occurrence of insects as inclusions in Dominican Amber is about 10 times higher than in Baltic amber. Amber lovers, scientists and collectors alike value Dominican Amber for the the window it opens, maybe not into Jurassic epoch but into the mysterious past of our wonderful planet. This fact gave way to the background story of Spielberg’s movie ‘JURASSIC PARK’ in which Dominican amber played a major role.

Enhydros (air and water inclusions) may enhance the color effect and add beauty to a piece of amber, even dust particles and stalactite formations might be interesting for scientists, jewelers and collectors alike. Amber from the Dominican Republic is renowned for the diversity of inclusions it contains.

Amber lovers, scientists and collectors alike value Dominican Amber for the three rare “treasures”, inclusions, which are scorpions, lizards and frogs. Probably only 30 to 40 scorpions, maybe 20 to 25 lizards and 9 or 10 frogs have been found worldwide. But inclusions like plants, insects, worms or even small vertebrates are even more fascinating.

spider inclusion in Dominican amber

Most specimens are rather small and large size pieces with rare inclusions are highly valuable. In addition, the visibility and the position of the inclusion inside the amber specimen are important factors. Nevertheless, despite many mosquitoes found as amber inclusions, the movie Jurassic Park still has a plot hole that is millions of years wide. Scientific consensus is that dinosaurs died out approximately 65 million years ago, while that same consensus also holds that Dominican amber is no more than 20 to 40 million years old.

This negates the possibility of ever finding dinosaur DNA in Dominican or even Baltic amber, which, according to G.O. Poinar’s “Life in Amber,” is 30 to 40 million years old. Amber from Northumberland in the USA is considered to be up to 345 million years old so, when compared to it, both Dominican and Baltic amber are “babies” and have no reason to be haggling over a few million years here and there. Amber lovers, scientists and collectors alike value Dominican Amber for the the window it opens through its inclusions, maybe not into Jurassic epoch but into the mysterious past of our wonderful planet.